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Multiage

Multiage (ages 3-5)

Plans were developed and implemented during the Summer of 2011 to change the overall educational philosophy of the CYC to a multiage approach for children three and older instead of the same-age grouping that had been used in the past. Some of the benefits of multiage grouping include:

  • Children spend more than one year with the same teacher, allowing the teacher to develop a better understanding of the child's strengths and needs so that she can better support the child's learning.
  • Children are viewed as unique individuals and the teaching focuses on each child according to his/her own strengths, unlike in same-age classrooms that often expect all children to perform at the same level.
  • Children become a family of learners who support and care for each other.
  • Older children and children with higher skill levels have the opportunity to serve as mentors and to take leadership roles.
  • Children are more likely to cooperate than compete.
  • Children are invited to take charge of their learning, by making choices at centers and with project work. This gives them a sense of ownership and self-direction which are the foundation for lifelong learning.
  • Children are more likely to cooperate than compete, making it possible for children to help each other as individuals, not see each other as competitors.
  • --The Association for Childhood Education International (ACEI)

    As children turn three-years-old and are developmentally ready, they will be promoted to the multiage classroom. In order to avoid moving one child at a time from a Weeschool classroom, the targeted promotion months will be August, January, and June. However, in the event that two or more children are ready to move up from a Weeschool classroom, promotions/transitions may take place outside the months listed above. This will also allow for more fluid promotion of our infants, toddlers, and two-year-olds which will allow for increased placement of families on the current waiting list.

    The children are learning how to be respectful of each other by being treated respectfully by our wonderful teachers. These teachers model responsive care, which means they adjust their teaching to meet each child's developmental needs, respond to the child's inner desire to understand and learn about the world around them, and respond to every child's daily needs with love, care and respect.






MULTIAGE TEACHERS

Laney Blaine

Laney Blaine


Laney has a Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education but quickly fell in love with preschool children and has been teaching the younger ones for 10 years now! She loves the play based environment the CYC provides and tries to create as many fun yet educational opportunities in her classroom as possible. She lives with her teenage daughter, cats and dog on the South East side of Indy. Miss Laney loves dancing, Mexican food, reading, and animals!
Janet Rawson

Janet Rawson


Ms. Janet has worked at the Center for Young Children for 10 years. Prior to coming here, she worked at Head Start in Indianapolis, and taught preschool and first grade in Washington, Massachusetts, and Kentucky. She received her BS in Early Childhood/Elementary Education from Indiana University. She is married and has three children and two grandchildren.
Beth Steward

Beth Steward


Beth graduated from IUPUI with a BS in Elementary Education and Concentration in Special Education. She worked at the Center for Young Children for four years as a classroom assistant before becoming a Lead Teacher in 2006. She believes each child has a unique learning style and strives to teach them accordingly through play and experiences.
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